Three Pen Names, One Romance Author

Did you know Jayne Ann Krentz , the author of numerous of New York Times bestsellers, uses three different pen names?

As Jayne Ann Krentz (her married name) she writes contemporary romantic-suspense.

When All the Girls Have Gone
When Charlotte Sawyer is unable to contact her step-sister, Jocelyn, to tell her that one her closest friends was found dead, she discovers that Jocelyn has vanished. In a desperate effort to find her, Charlotte joins forces with Max Cutler, a struggling PI who recently moved to Seattle after his previous career as a criminal profiler went down in flames–literally.

She uses Amanda Quick for her novels of historical romantic-suspense.

The Girl Who Knew Too Much
In 1930’s Hollywood, rookie reporter Irene Glasson (who found her previous employer murdered) discovers the body of an actress at the bottom of a California hotel pool. She investigates and finds herself drawn to Oliver Ward, a former magician. As the mystery deepens and more women die by drowning, Irene struggles to keep her own past a secret while she and Oliver hunt for the killer.

Jayne Castle (her birth name) is reserved for her stories of futuristic/paranormal romantic-suspense.

Illusion Town
Hannah West isn’t the first woman to wake up in Illusion Town married to a man she barely knows, but she has no memory of the ceremony at all. For that matter, neither does Elias Coopersmith, her new husband. All either of them can remember is that they were on the run. The coolly competent mining heir arouses her curiosity and interest. And even her dust bunny likes him! Set on the planet of Harmony in the future.

“I am often asked why I use a variety of pen names,” Krentz says.  “The answer is that this way readers always know which of my three worlds they will be entering when they pick up one of my books.”

Krentz’s three worlds often intermingle. Her Arcane Society series, books about men and women with paranormal power, spans all three of her worlds. Second Sight, written under the Amanda Quick pen name,  takes place in Victorian England at a time when the very old, very secret Arcane Society is about to run head-first into the 20th century. Flash forward to Jayne Ann Krentz’s White Lies, a tale of the Arcane Society in the 21st century. And then jump all the way to Jayne Castle’s Midnight Crystal, an Arcane society novel that takes place on the planet Harmony in the future. Characters from the novels that take place in the past are often referenced in the modern-day stories and the futuristic tales.

Not all her novels involve the paranormal. Many of her contemporary romance novels are stories of suspense in which the main characters must unravel a mystery that usually involves tracking down a killer.  Secret Sisters, River Road and Trust No One are three recently published works that fall into this category.

 

The library owns many of Krentz’s titles. if you enjoy romance and love romantic suspense and the paranormal, then any of Krentz’s three worlds will delight you.

You Know You Love Sci-fi if….

You know you love sci-fi if…

1. You see the words “Travel Program” in an email and think it says “Time Travel Program”.  (Yes, I did this! Wouldn’t that have been a great library program?)

2. Your collection of cosplay costumes is larger than your regular wardrobe. (Guilty.)

3. You have a working knowledge of Klingon. (Did you know that Klingon translations of works of world literature have been published? Just saying…)

4. You have strong feelings about the Star Wars versus Star Trek debate. (In the interests of not offending anyone, I’m going to give this a miss.)

5. When someone mentions the number 42, you laugh. (Every time.)

If this sounds like you,  you’re in luck! The Cheshire Library has a great collection of science fiction. Check out some of our new sci-fi arrivals:

The Hike
by Drew Magary
When Ben, a suburban family man, takes a business trip to rural Pennsylvania, he decides to spend the afternoon before his dinner meeting on a short hike. Once he sets out into the woods behind his hotel, he quickly comes to realize he is falling deeper and deeper into a world of man-eating giants, bizarre demons, and colossal insects, and the path he has chosen cannot be given up easily.

A Night Without Stars by Peter F. Hamilton
On a routine space flight, Major Ry Evine inadvertently frees a captive vessel that crash-lands on the planet of Bienvenido carrying the last, best hope for human survival: a baby. But a far from ordinary one. The child not only ages at a remarkable rate but demonstrates knowledge and abilities far beyond those of Bienvenido’s humans. Hunted by all, she is a crucial link to humanity’s lost past–and a  future already almost out of reach.

Take Back the Sky by Greg Bear
Marooned beneath the icy, waxy crust of Saturn’s moon, Titan, Skyrine Michael Venn and his comrades face double danger from Earth and from the Antagonists, both intent on wiping out their growing awareness of what the helpful alien Gurus are really doing in our solar system. Venn must  journey far beyond Pluto where he will finally understand his destiny and the destiny of every intelligent being in the solar system.

The Stars are Legion by Kameron Hurley
On the outer rim of the universe, a galactic war has been waged for centuries upon hundreds of world-ships. But these worlds will continue to die through decay and constant war unless a desperate plan succeeds. Anat, leader of the Katazyrna world-ship and the most fearsome raiding force on the Outer Rim, wants peace. To do so she offers the hand of her daughter, Jayd, to her rival.

Navigators of Dune by Brian Herbert
Navigators, mutated by spice into beings far superior to normal humans, have made space travel possible: their prescient awareness allows them to foresee safe paths through the universe as starships “fold” space. Only one man knows the secret of creating Navigators, and he intends to use them to build a commercial empire that spans the galaxy.  What could go wrong?

Spaceman of Bohemia by  Jaroslav Kalfar
Hoping to become a national hero, Czech astronaut Jakub Procha accepts a dangerous solo mission to Venus and faces unknown dangers, wavering sanity, Russian rivals, and a giant alien spider who engages him in philosophical conversations.

It’s International Cake Day!

July 20th is International Cake Day! Here’s a low-calorie way to celebrate the day.

The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake by Aimee Bender
Being able to taste people’s emotions in food may at first be horrifying. But young, unassuming Rose Edelstein grows up learning to harness her gift as she becomes aware that there are secrets even her taste buds cannot discern.

 

 

Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake by Anna Quindlin
In this irresistible memoir, the #1 “New York Times” bestselling author writes about her life and the lives of women today, looking back and ahead–and celebrating it all–as she considers marriage, girlfriends, our mothers, faith, loss, all that stuff in our closets, and more.

 

Wedding Cake Murder by Joanne Fluke
Hannah is marrying Ross Barton, her college crush, but not before she can solve the murder case of nasty celebrity chef Alain Duquesne found stabbed to death in the Lake Eden Inn’s walk-in cooler.

 

 

Eat Cake: A Novel by Jeanne Ray
Ruth draws on her talent for concocting delectable cakes and desserts when her family begins to disintegrate around her–her husband loses his job, her mother moves in, and her long-estranged father shows up at the door with no place to go.

 

 

Have Your Cake and Kill Him, Too by Nancy Martin
When the tycoon owner of a spectacularly tacky sports bar is killed, Nora Blackbird suspects a secretive politician, a shady former rock star doubling as a pastry chef, and a dangerous aristo-brat on the verge of stardom.

 

Colorful Workplaces

If you have been following our adventures in color, you may recall a previous post showing off the bright colors in the children’s room.  Well, the color revolution is continuing at Cheshire Public Library. Recently, we bid goodbye to the dull beige walls (dubbed “library paste white” by the staff) of the hallways around our offices  and added some color.

Our offices are in the basement of the library and windows are few. These wonderful colors have perked up the place considerably. Mint green. Golden yellow. Light blue. It’s a big improvement! Who says workplaces have to be dull?

Before

After

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join the color revolution! Whether you are decorating your office or your home, you can get started with these titles:

A Colorful Home: Create Lively Palettes for Every Room by Susan Hable.
Create dynamic palettes, and translate them into stunning interior spaces.

Color: The Perfect Shade for Every Room by Lisa Cregan.
Select the perfect hue for any room, create modern twists on traditional colors, experiment with colors you might never have considered, and more!

1001 Ideas for Color and Paint by Emma Callery.
Ideas range from contemporary treatments to traditional looks, in everything from bold colors to pretty pastels.

Crafting a Colorful Home: A Room by Room Guide to Personalizing Your Space with Color by Kristen Nicholas.
Learn how to make your home sing through handmade crafts and a bold use of color.

The Right Color by Eve Ashcraft.
The science of color, the language of color, finding your home’s palette, where to begin, inspirations for a palette and more!

Classic Read: The Ladies of Missalonghi

ladies2I recently revisited an old favorite, a  short novel set in Australia in the early 1900’s. The Ladies of Missalonghi, a tale by Australian author Colleen McCullough, has a rather dismal start. Missy Wright, a thirty-three year old spinster, lives in the town of Byron with her widowed mother and crippled aunt. The three women scrape along in genteel poverty, the victims of manipulative and greedy richer relatives. Their days are always the same: meager meals, chores, and the endless handicrafts that they create to fill the empty hours.

Missy, who believes her lack of beauty and lack of money have doomed her to never marry, has one escape from the dreariness of her life. She borrows novels from the local lending library and imagines the most spectacular adventures in her mind. The librarian, a distant relation named Una, is bright and vivacious and very interested in Missy, who is generally considered a non-entity by her other relatives.

Slowly, as Missy interacts with Una, she begins to change. She stops letting local shopkeepers push her around. She stands up against a rude and condescending cousin. She takes walks alone in the bush, experiencing the beauty of her natural environment, an experience that has always been denied her in the interest of keeping her “safe”.

Missy’s evolution is an unconventional fairy tale. No one rescues her; she saves herself. Una is an example for Missy to follow rather than a fairy godmother who grants requests. There is a prince of sorts–John Smith, a mysterious newcomer to the town of Byron who is not searching for a princess but running from his past.

This short tale can be read in one sitting. Through-out the story, I kept  wondering if Missy’s newfound strength would backfire. Could she possibly stand up to an entire town, not to mention a tradition of systematic discrimination against the poor widows and spinsters in her family? Would those richer relations turn and crush her? Would her mother and aunt, who are so steeped in family tradition, even support her in her quest for freedom? There were a few surprises before I discovered the answers to these questions.

This light yet lovely tale is enjoyable.  A recommended read for those who like light romance with descriptive settings.