What’s Happening at Cheshire Library in February

February’s a short month, but it’s long on programs here at Cheshire Library. Visit our Event Calendar for the full roster of programs for adults & kids this month – here are some highlights!

Explore New Worlds: Virtual Reality Tours

Monday, February 3, 2020, 6:00 – 7:30pm

Experience virtual reality with the library’s Oculus Quest headsets. Choose from 3 of our own Cheshire-based VR adventures or visit other new places and experiences. The event starts at 6pm, but you will be contacted prior to the event with the exact time of your personal session.   Sessions will be in the order of registration.

Drop-in Tech Help

  • Tuesday, February 4,  1:00 – 2:30pm
  • Wednesday, February 19, 11:00am – 12:30pm
Do you have questions about your laptop, smartphone, or iPad? Do you need help navigating the internet or downloading an ebook? Bring your technology-related questions and issues to Cheshire Public Library’s Drop-In Tech Help. Our librarians will be available to answer your questions and offer advice. NOTE: Please be sure your device is charged beforehand. Tech help is available on a first come first served basis. Tech help may be limited to 15 minutes per person.

Terrific Tweens – Let’s Make Wishing Bracelets!

Wednesday, February 5, 2020, 4:00 – 4:45pm

Kids in grades 5-8 can drop in and decorate paper beads on one side with crayons, markers or pencils, and then write a wish on the other. Then we’ll roll them up, string them together and wish for good things! No registration required.

Take Your Child to the Library Day

Saturday, February 8, 2020 9:00am – 5:00pm

Celebrate your local library today! Stop by the Children’s Room and go on a scavenger hunt, play with toys, crafts, and more! Cheshire residents of any age can get a library card with a photo ID and proof of address. Non-residents can bring their card from their hometown library and get set up to borrow Cheshire materials. And as always, no card is needed to enjoy the day’s activities!

The Winter-Wonderland Music, Bubble and Comedy Show!

Saturday, February 8, 2020, 10:00 – 10:45am

This movement-focused 45-minute performance by Turtle Dance Music is a musical experience that is designed to engage children through song, movement, stories, projections, and interactive music technology! Best for children ages 2-12 but younger siblings are welcome to attend. Please register in advance for this program.

Sally Rogers concert

Sunday, February 9, 2020, 2:00 – 3:15pm

Join us for a concert of traditional, contemporary and original ballads and songs with acclaimed folk musician and recording artist Sally Rogers. Much of the material Sally performs includes compositions of her own (accompanying herself on guitar and Appalachian dulcimer),  many of which are considered classics of the folk and popular genre.  No registration required.

Intermediate Mac

Tuesday, February 11, 2020, 11:00am – 12:00pm

Have you purchased a Mac and want to learn more about the applications?  In this lecture style class we will go over Calendar, Photos, Finder, Preview and more. To take this class you must have a fundamental understanding of Mac computers.   Please bring your fully charged Mac computer and all applicable passwords. Space is limited and registration is required.

Learn to Scan Family Photos

Thursday, February 13, 2020, 2:00 – 3:00pm

Do you have albums and boxes of family photos that you would like to digitize? You can do it for free at the Library! Learn how to use the Scannx Scan Center on the library’s lower level in this short hands-on demonstration. Registration is required.

Author Talk: Dear George, Dear Mary

Thursday, February 13, 2020, 6:30 – 8:00pm

Author Mary Calvi has written a fascinating book called Dear George, Dear Mary: A Novel of George Washington’s First Love. Did unrequited love spark a flame that ignited a cause that became the American Revolution? Dear George, Dear Mary explores George’s relationship with his first love, New York heiress Mary Philipse, the richest belle in Colonial America.  Books will be for sale and signing after the presentation. Registration is required.

Simply Lincoln

Saturday, February 22, 2020, 2:00 – 4:00pm

Being in the presence of Howard Wright as President Abraham Lincoln is an experience you will not soon forget. Dressed in precise period attire and speaking with a Kentucky accent, Lincoln’s mannerisms, speaking style, and humanity flows over the listener with each moving sentence, witty observance, or eloquent description of a tortuous time that was the Civil War.  Registration is required.

The Hot Flashes concert

Sunday, February 23, 2020, 2:00 – 3:00pm

The Hot Flashes are an exciting and eclectic group fronted by three female vocalists who have made a name for themselves on the New England music scene showcasing their tight vocal harmonies and jazzy acoustic stylings. Join us for a rousing afternoon of bluegrass, folk, vintage country, swing, jazz, and blues tunes…with a few cowgirl and traditional tunes thrown in for good measure! No registration required.

Principles of Organic Gardening

Monday, February 24, 2020, 1:00 – 2:00pm

This talk by Dr. Yonghao Li from the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station  will explain the basic elements of successful organic gardening including site selection, soil preparation, garden design, irrigation, mulching, fertilization, and disease management. Registration is required.

Trivia Afternoon

Monday, February 24, 2020, 3:00 – 4:30pm

Come by yourself or bring friends. Test your knowledge from general categories including pop culture, current events, history, music, and of course, literature! Registration required for this adult program. When registering please register entire group from one person to a max five people.

The Changing Nature of the American Presidency

Tuesday, February 25, 2020, 6:30 – 8:00pm

Dr. Matthew Warshauer, Professor of History, Central Connecticut State University, will deliver a talk on The Changing Nature of the American Presidency. Dr. Warshauer received his Ph.D. (1997) in American Studies at Saint Louis University and joined the faculty at CCSU that same year. He is the author of several history books. Registration is required.

New England Country Dance

Thursday, February 27, 2020, 6:30 – 8:00pm

Join us for a night of dance!  Hosted by  Rich Sbardella who has been a dance caller for thirty years.  Please wear good shoes for dancing! Registration is required for this adult program.

Color Yourself Calm & Watch a Movie

Saturday, February 29, 2020, 2:00 – 3:30pm

Back by popular demand! De-Stress from your busy life and color. In addition to coloring we will be watching New in Town (2009, rated PG) starring Renee Zellweger and Harry Connick Jr. All supplies will be provided, but feel free to bring your own. Registration required for this adult program.

 

Books to Cozy Up With This Winter

What, I ask you, is better that curling up inside with good book when it’s cold and blustery outside? So grab a blanket and a hot beverage, throw another log on the fire, and grab a couple of library books to cozy up with during the long winter nights ahead.

Here are ten to tempt you:

Beartown by Frederik Backman. People say Beartown is finished. But down by the lake stands an old ice rink, built generations ago by the working men who founded this town. And in that ice rink is the reason people in Beartown believe tomorrow will be better than today junior ice hockey team is about to compete in the national semifinals.

Winter Solstice by Rosamunde Pilcher. Five people, buffeted by life’s difficulties, come together at a rundown estate house in Northern Scotland during a revelatory Winter Solstice.

One Day in December by Josie Silver. Tells the story of Jack and Laurie, who meet at a bus stop and continue to circle each other’s lives seemingly fated to be together, except not actually managing it, for a ten years.
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The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey. A childless couple working a farm in the brutal landscape of 1920 Alaska discover a little girl living in the wilderness, with a red fox as a companion, and begin to love the strange, almost-supernatural child as their own.
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The Snowman by Jo Nesbø. In Oslo, after the first snow of the season has fallen, a woman disappears, and a sinister snowman is left in her wake. Detective Harry Hole realizes that this is only one of multiple disappearances, he begins to think a serial killer may be at work.
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Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater. Sam has lived two lives: In winter, the frozen woods, the protection of the pack, and the silent company of a fearless girl. In summer, a few precious months of being human . . . until the cold makes him shift back again.
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Smilla’s Sense of Snow by Peter Høeg. Isaiah, the son of one of Smilla Jasperson’s neighbors, is found face-down in the snow outside her Copenhagen apartment building. Smilla quickly rejects the official verdict of accidental death when she observes the footprints the boy left in the snow, and starts investigating.
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Mr. Dickens and His Carol by Samantha Silva. After poor reviews about his latest book, writer Charles Dickens is given a one-month ultimatum by his publisher to write a successful, nostalgic Christmas book, a challenge that is complicated by self-doubt and the hardships of an impoverished young woman and her son.

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. The classic tale chronicles the joys and sorrows of the four March sisters as they grow into young ladies in nineteenth-century New England.

The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman. In an alternative world in which every human being is accompanied by an animal familiar, the disappearance of several children prompts Lyra and her bear protector to undertake a journey to the frozen Arctic in pursuit of kidnappers.

 

Hope in the Hot Zone

No, I won’t bore you with flu information. Let’s talk about something more deadly.

There have been a LOT of deadly epidemics throughout history. AIDS/HIV has killed 36 million people since 1981, a virus with a 99.9% fatality rate, though after billions of dollars we’re down to “only” 1.6 million deaths per year, world-wide. The 1918 flu epidemic (the same flu you get a shot for, H1N1) killed 20-50 million people in less than two years. The Black Death, that 1346 wave of flea-borne bubonic plague, killed 200 million. Plague, carried in the US by squirrels and prairie dogs, still kills 100 people a year. Another mega-epidemic was the Plague of Justinian in 541, which coincided with a major volcanic eruption – some believe it was an earlier explosion of the famous Krakatoa – and a year with crazy weather and an abundance of misery, killed 50 million. It’s also believed to have been Bubonic Plague. The plague of Antonine in 165 AD, brought back by Roman soldiers, killed 25 million people and might have been either Measles or Smallpox. The entire population of New England plus New York State is 30 million.

In the case of viruses – HIV, Smallpox, Measles, Flu – those numbers were due to germs released on a population that had little to no immunity. Measles has been around for millennia, but viruses mutate. Mutations are accidents during reproduction – like the first case of left-handedness, or blue eyes. Viruses can reproduce rapidly inside a cell; if they multiply every 20 minutes, and if you expect one accident every 1,000 generations, that’s 1600 mutations every eight hours. Some mutations can render a virus or bacteria weaker. But sometimes, they become more dangerous.

Like Ebola.

I don’t know why, but I’ve read almost every book by anyone who’s worked on Ebola. The Hot Zone is one of my favorites. So of course, along comes Richard Preston and writes another book on the most recent outbreak of Ebola, a disease that, untreated, has a 90% fatality rate, and a 40% rate if treated with supportive care (let’s not forget, Smallpox had a 30% fatality rate. Yeah, maybe before your time, but that’s why there was such a forced vaccine campaign to eradicate it.) Ebola is extremely contagious – just one particle, out of the billions spewed by each victim, can be deadly.

In his new book, Crisis in the Red Zone, Preston begins with the 1976 outbreak,  then covers the 2014 outbreak, so you can see just how far medicine has come in those 40 years, from reusing the same needle without sterilizing it to PCR breakdown of the genetic code of Ebola. Six strains have been identified; the new one, Ebola Makona, is four times more deadly, the result of just one mutation swapping one single amino acid.

Why should Ebola bother you? As Preston reiterates time and time again, if the countries where Ebola is endemic cannot handle an outbreak, imagine Ebola getting loose on a subway in New York, by a person who gets off in Grand Central, and then walks to a play on Broadway, even though they’re feeling a bit feverish and coughing. They’ve now infected several thousand people, who will infect several thousand people, who will get on planes and fly around the world, spreading the virus very rapidly, to major cities with crowded airports. The risk is entirely too real, on medical systems not the least bit prepared to handle it – there are barely 400 Level-4 isolation beds in the ENTIRE US. (And yes, in the last epidemic, Ebola DID make it to the US, all the way to Texas, where it killed two people. )

However, there is now hope – ZMapp was the first antibody-driven treatment for Ebola, taking a victim literally in the process of their last breaths to walking around *in one hour*.  And yet, two new drugs with the unimaginative names of REGN-EB3 and mAB114 were found to be better – bringing a death rate of 90% to a survival rate of 90%. There has also been the creation of an Ebola vaccine, which is 97% effective. Preston chronicles the moral and ethical dilemma of these developments – you cannot have trials in people because of the fatality rate of the disease, and in giving an unknown treatment to people who already have a 50% chance of living, you may kill them with the “cure”. How do you give informed consent when no one knows what the drug will do? And who do you choose to give a possible cure to?

Read the book. It’s got all the angst of a good murder mystery, the joys of survival, and medical miracles on top. If you live on Earth or do business here, you really need to be aware of these things.

Wash your hands and check out some of these other awesome books on viruses!

 

The big, BIG list of literary adaptions coming to screens in 2020

There are so many outlets for watching movies and series out there nowadays, the amount of content is a bit overwhelming! With the current glut of original content hitting our big and small screens, it can be a bit of a shot in the dark to find something to watch that’s actually good. Which is why literary adaptations are experiencing a bit of a heyday, movies and TV based on popular books have a built-in fan base from people who’ve read and enjoyed the books, and also introduce the source material to new readers.

Several book-based series are continuing with new seasons this year:  season 5 of the Starz series Outlander, (based on The Fiery Cross by Diana Gabaldon), season 3 of BBC series C.B. Strike, (based on Lethal White by Robert Galbraith),  and season 2 of the HBO series His Dark Materials, (based on The Subtle Knife by Philip Pullman) are all coming to the small screen in 2020.

Beyond that, the list of new movies and television set to be released in the coming year is  HUGE. Check out all this book-based programming :

JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

DECEMBER

There are still more book adaptations expected to premiere in 2020, with release dates yet to be finalized:

This is not a completely comprehensive list, and is subject to change as the year goes on. What literary adaptations are you most excited to see this year?

 

What’s Happening at Cheshire Library in January

Happy New Year! We’ve packed January with programs to help you start off 2020 right!

New Movie Thursday: Judy (2019)

Thursday, January 2, 2020, 6:00 – 8:00pm

Did you miss the screening of a film you wanted to see in theaters?  Join us for the first Thursday of the month for a screening of a recently released film. This month we’re screening Judy, the biopic about Judy Garland, starring Renee Zellweger, rated PG-13. Registration is appreciated.

Nekita Waller concert

Sunday, January 5, 2020, 2:00pm – 3:30pm

Nekita Waller, Connecticut’s 17th  State Troubadour, will perform a mix of pop, Motown, soul, jazz, gospel and classic rock favorites together with some of her favoite sidemen! No registration required.

Tuesday Movie Matinees

Tuesdays at 1:00pm

A different popular film on the big screen, Tuesday afternoons at CPL. No registration required.

  • January 7: Varsity Blues (1999)
  • January 14: Growing Up Smith (2015)
  • January 21: Marty (1955)
  • January 28: Holiday (1938)

Shooting Vietnam with Author Dan Brookes

Tuesday, January 7, 2020, 6:30 – 8:00pm

Shooting Vietnam by Dan Brookes & Bob Hillerby  shares firsthand accounts of what it was like to be a military combat photographer in the most photographed war in history. The book contains hundreds of photographs by men who lived the war through the lens of a camera. Registration is required.

Let’s Celebrate the 20’s!

Thursday, January 9, 2020, 2:30 – 4:30pm

Lets celebrate the roaring ’20s! Join us for a screening of Downton Abbey : the Motion Picture (2019).   Bring your favorite teacup, tea and light refreshments will be served. Come in 20’s attire and have your picture taken at a speakeasy! Registration is required.

Preschool Fair

Saturday, January 11, 2020, 10:00am – 12:00pm

Want to explore the many great opportunities for your child’s preschool education within the Cheshire community? Representatives from local preschools will be at Cheshire Public Library to give you information regarding school facilities, teaching staff, and educational philosophies. Activities for children and refreshments will be provided. Please register so we can contact you in the event of inclement weather. Snow date is January 18.

Food and Inflammation

Thursday, January 16, 2020, 6:30 – 7:40pm

Inflammation in the body is related to many diseases. Marisa McCoy, a Registered Dietitian, will discuss foods that make it worse and foods that make it better. Registration is required.

Intro to iPad

Friday, January 17, 2020, 10:00 – 11:30am

Join us for this lecture style class as we will learn the fundamentals of the iPad.  We will go over how to turn on your device on and off and how to use various apps.  Bring your fully charge iPad if you own one, but a device is not required. Registration is required.

Intro to Social Media

Wednesday, January 22, 2020, 1:00 – 2:00pm

Learn the basics of using social media to connect with friends and family.  We will cover everything you need to get started using Facebook, Twitter and Instagram in a friendly relaxed atmosphere. Registration is required.

How to Spot Fake News

Thursday, January 23, 2020, 6:30 – 8:00pm

This talk by Kenn Venit will focus on what “news consumers” should be aware of in terms of how various media ethics, competitiveness, ownerships ,revenue, bias and other factors may affect news coverage. Registration is required.

Caryn Lin’s One-Woman Musical Extravaganza

Sunday, January 26, 2020, 2:00 – 3:00pm

Tradition and technology meet when classically trained violinist Caryn Lin literally transforms sound! With her electric violin and the technology of looping and sound effects, on the spot recordings emerge.  Layers of sound with deceptively simple melodies create music that is both other worldly and totally catchy. No registration required.

Trivia Afternoon

Monday, January 27, 2020, 3:00 – 4:30pm

Come by yourself or bring friends. Test your knowledge from general categories, including pop culture, current events, history, music, and of course literature! Registration is required for this adult program (please register entire group, from one person to a maximum of five people).

Books Over Coffee: Killers of the Flower Moon

Wednesday, January 29, 2020, 12:00 – 1:30pm

Join us for an adult monthly book club program called “Books Over Coffee.”  On the last Wednesday of every month we’ll meet from 12-1:30 in The Loft to discuss the selected title. This month we are discussing Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann. You bring your lunch, we’ll provide the coffee and tea. Registration is required.

The Kondo/KonMari Organizing Method

Thursday, January 30, 2020, 6:30 – 8:00pm

Let this be the year you get organized! Join us as Certified KonMari consultant Christine Thorn of Connecticut presents a informative, in-depth and entertaining talk on Marie Kondo and the KonMari Method™, as detailed Kondo’s bestselling book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. Registration is required.