It’s National Train Your Dog Month!

The purpose of Train Your Dog Month is to “promote training the family dog with everyday manners” as defined by the Association of Professional Dog Trainers.

If you’d like to get started on Fido’s social and behavioral skills, you don’t need to wait for a class! The Cheshire Public Library has you covered.

Dog Training 101 : step-by-step instructions for raising a happy, well-behaved dog by Kyra Sundance.
(ebook)
Using a visually driven, playful presentation, Dog Training 101 offers step-by-step instructions every dog owner needs to know as you care for and raise your canine best friend. From basic commands like sit and stay to everything you’ll need to prepare for a new dog’s arrival, renowned dog trainer Kyra Sundance is your friendly and expert guide.

The Power of Positive Dog Training  by Pat Miller.
(downloadable audiobook)
Renowned dog trainer Pat Miller gives you the positive training tools you need to ensure that you and your dog share a lifetime of fun, companionship, and respect. By following her step-by-step, six-week basic training program, you’ll learn how to develop a relationship with your dog based on friendship and positive reinforcement, not fear and punishment.

Zak George’s dog training revolution : the complete guide to raising the perfect pet with love  by Zak George.
(downloadable audiobook)
Celebrity dog trainer, YouTube sensation, and Animal Planet star Zak George presents a next-generation guide that uses his infectiously energetic style to teach dog-lovers everything they need to know about raising and training their unique pup. His fresh approach puts a strong emphasis on the relationship with the individual dog.

Dog Training for Dummies by Jack and Wendy Volhard.
This friendly guide shows you how to select the right training method for your dog, based on his unique personality, to reach your desired goals. Whether you want to teach Buddy to sit or master retrieving, you’ll get expert training tips and techniques for you and your dog — to ensure a mutually respectful relationship with your four-legged friend.

Cesar’s rules : your way to train a well-behaved dog by Cesar Millan.
Cesar Millan takes on the topic of training for the first time, by explaining the importance of balance as the foundation for a healthy relationship between you and your dog. In order to provide a variety of training options, he calls upon some of the foremost experts in the field to offer their advice so that you can find the perfect approach that works for you and your dog through a variety of methods. 

Want to see everything we have on dog training? Click here.

The Best Audiobooks of 2017 (a subjective list)

The editors of AudioFile Magazine have released their selections for Best Audiobooks of 2017. AudioFile is a publication that reviews and recommends audiobooks, taking into account all the things that make an audiobook enjoyable: a great story, of course, but also the skillful pacing, structure, and narration that make them worth listening to.  (Full disclosure: I am a reviewer for AudioFile, mainly for romance books, and I have received free audiobooks from them to provide honest reviews). I have perused the dozens of audiobooks selected as “best”, and winnowed them down to three favorites in six categories, click on the titles to read more about each one. Consider this a jumping off point, audiophiles!

GENERAL FICTION

  • Beartown by Frederik Backman, read by Marin Ireland.
  • Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward, read by Kelvin Harrison, Jr., Rutina Wesley, Chris Chalk.
  • Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders, read by Nick Offerman, David Sedaris and George Saunders, with a full cast that includes Carrie Brownstein, Don Cheadle, Kat Dennings, Lena Dunham, Bill Hader, Miranda July, Mary Karr, Keegan-Michael Key, Julianne Moore, Megan Mullally, Mike O’Brien, Susan Sarandon, Ben Stiller, Jeffrey Tambor, Jeff Tweedy, Bradley Whitford, Patrick Wilson, and Rainn Wilson.

MYSTERY & SUSPENSE

SCI-FI, FANTASY, HORROR

ROMANCE

YA FICTION

MEMOIR

Checking Your Flu

It’s almost impossible to get through the winter without hearing about the flu. While we often use the word flu to describe any miserable feverish head cold, a cold (rhinovirus) is NOT the same as the flu (influenza). A head cold is 10 days of misery. Flu will disable you for weeks, if not outright kill you.

Flu shots are a government conspiracy. I got the shot and still got the flu.

Preventing death and permanent disability is not a conspiracy. Complications of a cold include sinus and ear infections, asthma, or rarely pneumonia. The most common complication of the flu is pneumonia – the #4 killer world-wide, but can also leave you with organ damage or failure,  encephalitis, and even sepsis. If you get the flu shot and then feel lousy, it’s not flu; it’s your body charging up its antibodies. If you get a flu shot and then get a cold, it’s not the flu. Recombinant flu vaccines don’t even contain flu. CAN you get the flu after getting a flu shot? Of course you can, the same way you seem to get the same cold every year. Here’s why:

Is there more than one type of flu?

There are actually three flu viruses, A, B, and C. A is common, B less so, C mild and rare. Each type has two parts: the hemaglutinin protein (the H) and an enzyme to let it reproduce (the N, for neuraminidase). There are 18 types of H’s and 11 types of N’s – thousands of combinations of H1N1’s, H2N3’s, H6N4’s. Now, not all of these can be caught by people (some are limited to animals), but viruses can mutate and change very rapidly. With all those combinations, the Centers for Disease Control have to make a best guess at what flu will prevail that winter, and make enough vaccine a year in advance. If your shot is for N1H1, and you catch H2N3 – you’ve got flu. Better flu shots (called trivalent or quadravalent) will give you immunity to the top three or four likely flus, quadrupling your chances of staying healthy. Even if you do manage to get a flu, your partial immunity will give you a much milder case.

What are the odds I will get the flu?

What are your chances? In the winter of 2016-17, more than 2500 Connecticut residents showed up at the Emergency Department for flu-like illnesses. 80% of those were type A, and of those , 98% of them were of the H3N2 variety (the others were the old H1N1). Sixty-five of them died. That’s not a total of reported cases; that’s just how many wound up hospitalized. If you have diabetes, heart problems, take immune suppressors, pregnant, sickle cell disease, cancer treatment, are over 65 or under 2, you are considered high risk. If someone in your family or workplace fits these categories, you are placing them at risk.

Now, of course, some years are worse for flu than others. The biggie was 1918, when the H1N1 (yes, that same one you’re getting vaccinated for right now) had a new mutation to a form no one had ever had before, and it became a world-wide pandemic for two years, killing as many as 50 million people. Fifty. 5-0. Million. The next major flu was 1957 Asian flu (H2N2), which killed two million people. The 1968 Hong Kong flu (H3N2) killed more than a million. That’s not counting disabled, or lost 30 days from work, or sick as a dog. That’s the number dead.

Why do so many flus start in Asia?

Many flu strains are animal-only. They’re limited to birds, or horses, or pigs. In Asia, people, chickens, and pigs are often living in close or crowded conditions, and many Asian cities are very densely populated. Pigs are very similar to people in their genetic makeup (surgeons can use pig organs in people for short times). A bird flu can mutate and jump to pigs, and from pigs it doesn’t take a lot of mutation to become a Human flu. This is why scientists worry every time there’s a breakout of swine flu or bird flu, and millions of animals may be slaughtered to keep it from spreading. All it takes is a new mutation to start a mega-deadly 1918-style pandemic.

Should everyone get a flu shot?

So who should NOT get a flu shot? Check with your doctor first if you’ve got Guillain-Barre Syndrome, if you have immune disorders such as HIV, children on aspirin therapy, severe egg allergies, people with certain metabolic disorders, if you have kidney disease or severe respiratory issues. Sometimes it’s worth the risk, sometimes it’s not, depending on the year.

Washing your hands constantly remains the next-best flu preventative. And while you’re avoiding the flu, or perhaps recovering from it, check out these really awesome books on the flu (I’ve read them!) – and some excellent (scary) novels on flu (check for movie versions, too!) :

            

                 

                   

What’s Happening at Cheshire Library in January

Happy New Year! We hope one of your resolutions is to visit the library more this year, check out some of the programs we’ve got coming up in January!

Crafternoons (for grades K-6)

Tuesday Jan 2, 2018, 4:00  –  4:45 PM
 Drop-in for seasonal and fun crafts for kids!  Materials will be provided by the library, no registration required.

Bring Your Own Crafts (for Adults)

Thursday Jan 4, 2018, 6:00  –  8:00 PM

Coloring, stitching, drawing, stamping, scrapbooking, if it’s crafty, bring it in!  Come for a relaxing and de-stressing night of crafting. We will meet most every first Thursday of the month. There will be plenty of room to spread out for your crafts.  Some supplies will be provided for this adult program. Registration is required.

 

Cookbook Club: Slow Cooker

Wednesday Jan 10, 2018, 6:30  –  8:00 PM

What better way to connect with your fellow humans than by breaking bread together? To our January Cookbook Club meeting, bring a slow-cooker dish, along with copies of your recipe(s), and the cookbook(s) you used.  Must be at least 18 years of age or older to participate.  By registering for the program, participants acknowledge that they may choose to consume food that has not been prepared in a commercial kitchen.

Introduction to Microsoft Word

Part 1 – Thursday Jan 11, 2018, 12:30 PM  –  2:30 PM

Part 2 – Thursday Jan 18, 2018, 12:30 PM  –  2:30 PM

This class will provide an introduction to Microsoft Word and is divided into two sessions. Registration is required.

  • You will learn basic navigation skills to effectively use the Microsoft Word program.
  • Create a simple document.
  • Edit text and check spelling errors.
  • Format the document.
  • Insert a picture; change font formatting and much more.

Library After Hours: Spirits Alive!

Friday Jan 12, 2018, 6:00  –  7:00 PM

This month Library After Hours is hosting the Cheshire Historical Society’s Spirits Alive show! Five spirits from the past will be at the library to tell their stories. If you missed this sold-out show in October, now is your chance to experience some of the tales from the grave. By turns funny, sad, and thought-provoking, you’ll delight in these live performances. Please note, the lobby and children’s room will be open to the public but the lower level of the library will not.  Pizza, snacks and drinks will be available for sale from the Friends of the Library.  There is no admission fee, but there is a suggested donation of $5 per family to help offset costs. Seating is limited, registration is required.

Zumba for Adults

  • Wednesday Jan 17 – 2:00-3:00
  • Wednesday Jan 24 – 2:00-3:00
  • Wednesday Jan 31 – 2:00 -3:00

Burn calories and have fun doing it! Our Zumba class is open to adults of any skill or fitness level and is designed to teach the basic dance steps and easy to follow movements. Registration is required.

Zumba for Kids

  • Wednesday Jan 17 – 3:00-3:30
  • Wednesday Jan 24 – 3:00-3:30
  • Wednesday Jan 31 – 3:00-3:30

Perfect for younger Zumba fans!  Zumba Kids feature kid-friendly routines. This class helps develop a healthy lifestyle and incorporate fitness as a natural part of children’s lives by making fitness fun.

Goal Setting

Wednesday Jan 17, 2018, 6:00  –  7:30 PM

Are you struggling in one area of your life, or maybe more?  Do you know why?  Would you like to learn how to identify what your goals are and then how to take the steps to attain those goals?  Certified Life Coach Fiona Bain brings her sense of humor and love for life to help others become empowered in their own lives, to take steps to reach their goals and relieve their anxiety about what steps they want to take next. Registration is required.

Wake up Your Thyroid- Naturally Improve Thyroid, Energy and

Metabolism

Thursday Jan 18, 2018, 6:30 PM

Dr. David DeRosa, D.C., Clinical Nutritionist will discuss:

  •  Why half of all thyroid disorders go misdiagnosed.
  • The two missing nutritional links no one talks about.
  • Learn simple steps you can take to promote balance in your thyroid.

Registration is required.

Trivia Night

Wednesday Jan 24, 2018, 6:00  –  8:00 PM

Come by yourself or bring your friends. Test your knowledge from general categories, including pop culture, current events, history, music, and of course literature! It’s all For Pride, Not Prize.  Registration required for this adult program beginning January 10.

Introduction to PowerPoint

Part 1 – Thursday Jan 25, 12:30  –  2:30 PM

Part 2 – Thursday Feb 01, 12:30  –  2:30 PM

This class will provide introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint and is divided into two sessions. Registration is required. You will learn to:

  • Create a new presentation.
  • Modify presentation.
  • Add and edit text.
  • Insert clipart images and shapes to slides.
  • Add sound and video to a slide presentation and more…

Movement For Your Busy Life

Thursday Jan 25, 2018, 6:30  –  7:30 PM

In this fast-paced world it seems impossible to fit in any kind of exercise or movement into our work day. Mary Hurley, holistic health coach and certified personal trainer, will teach you a series of breathing techniques, stretching and strengthening movements that can be done throughout your work day with no special equipment. Registration is required.

Valentine Cards

Monday Jan 29, 2018, 6:00  –  7:30 PM

One of the many joys of the Valentine’s Day is sending cheerful cards to the ones you love.  Join Sue Bernier and create beautiful Valentine cards. You will use rubber stamps, ink and Stampin’ Up products to create your cards.  All levels are invited to join.   Registration is required.

 

 

 

Our staff’s favorite books of 2017

What was the best book you read in 2017? This is the question I posed to my fellow staff members at CPL. Interestingly, I got no duplicate answers! We have a wide variety of reading preferences among our staff, which means there’s something for everyone in this list. Maybe your next great read is below:

Our Library Director Ramona  picked the audiobook edition of  News of the World by Paulette Jiles, read by Grover Gardner. In the aftermath of the Civil War, an aging itinerant news reader agrees to transport a young captive of the Kiowa back to her people in this exquisitely rendered, morally complex, multilayered novel of historical fiction.

Teen Librarian Kelley really liked Dusk or Dark or Dawn or Day by Seanan McGuire. In this urban fantasy, Jenna, who died  too soon, works to regain the years that were lost to her. But something has come for the ghosts of New York, something beyond reason, beyond death, beyond hope; something that can bind ghosts to mirrors and make them do its bidding. Only Jenna stands in its way.

Bill is our Head of Adult Services, and he picked the Bruce Springsteen autobiography Born to Run as his favorite read of 2017. In 2009, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band performed at the Super Bowl’s half-time show. The experience was so exhilarating that Bruce decided to write about it, which is how this extraordinary autobiography began. Springsteen traces his life from his childhood in a Catholic New Jersey family and the musical experiences that prompted his career to the rise of the E Street Band and the stories behind some of his most famous songs.

Children’s Librarian Lauren went with The Sun is Also a Star, a young adult novel by Nicola Yoon.  In this story Natasha, whose family is hours away from being deported, and Daniel, a first generation Korean American on his way to a prestigious college admissions interview, cross paths in New York. They unexpectedly fall in love during an intense day in the city.

 

More books our staff loved last year:

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas,  Winter of the Gods by Jordanna Max Brodsky, Evicted by Matthew Desmond, All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, Illusion Town by Jayne Castle,  The Purloining of Prince Oleomargarine by Mark Twain and Philip Stead, Border Child by Michael Stone, Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult, Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole, Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple, Devil in Spring by Lisa Kleypas, The Genius of Birds by Jennifer Ackerman, Glass Houses by Louise Penny